ACRU files two SCOTUS briefs upholding Second Amendment rights

ACRU recently filed two amicus briefs with the Supreme Court questioning whether lifetime bans on firearm ownership in cases where citizens were convicted of non-violent crimes is constitutional as applied. In separate cases, a woman convicted of tax fraud in 2011 and a man convicted of misdemeanor DUI in 2005 were blocked from firearm purchases after they satisfied their sentences and have been law-abiding since. In both cases, ACRU argues these convictions should not block the right of these Americans to exercise their Second Amendment rights.

2021-01-21T08:36:15-05:00January 21st, 2021|

Truth revealed: Liberal plans to change the Supreme Court

In every election, when you vote for your presidential candidate of choice, you also “vote” for a potential SCOTUS nominee. It has never been more true than in 2020. Liberals send (deliberately?) mixed messages on SCOTUS policy. In this article, Hillsdale College’s Matthew Spaulding provides both historical and contemporary information to help us become more informed on this important subject.

2020-11-03T09:57:32-05:00November 3rd, 2020|

What ‘court-packing’ is – and isn’t

The SCOTUS nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett brought up an inside baseball term that needs defining. “Court-packing” is NOT a duly elected president filling a vacant seat as duty demands. Court-packing is adding judicial seats — by one political party — where justices serve in perpetuity. It ensures the packing party has decades of unilateral ideological control. Every candidate for president has a moral obligation to explain it truthfully to the American people while stating personal intent.

2020-10-28T20:20:41-04:00October 28th, 2020|

The Supreme Court Declines to Consider Price v. Chicago

On July 2, the U.S. Supreme Court denied certiorari in the case of Price v. City of Chicago, although Justice Thomas would have granted the petition. The American Constitutional Rights Union, joined by Students for Life in America, filed an amicus brief in support of the Petitioners, who were challenging the constitutionality of a Chicago ordinance limiting the speech rights of anti-abortion protesters.

2020-07-31T17:51:22-04:00July 31st, 2020|

Justice Roberts becomes the anti-religious freedom swing vote

An un-Constitutional and absurd ruling from the Supreme Court last week decided a Nevada church had to adhere to arbitrary and biased COVID guidelines from its liberal governor. Democrat Governor Sisolak is allowing hundreds of people into bars and casinos but only 50 souls per church without even considering church size. Casting the First Amendment to the wind, liberal justices were joined by Justice Roberts in pretending our first freedoms are less important than cocktails and Blackjack.

2020-07-31T15:36:27-04:00July 31st, 2020|

Compare and contrast: religious liberty

Last week the Supreme Court ruled in favor of religious liberty for the Little Sisters of the Poor and Our Lady of Guadalupe School. One decision upheld the right of religious groups to be exempt from providing contraceptive and the abortion coverage, and the other confirmed that faith based schools can make faith based hiring decisions. Meanwhile, in China, its government blocked three US congressmen and an ambassador from entry because they stand firm on religious liberty.

2020-07-18T09:34:25-04:00July 18th, 2020|

Current SCOTUS case could chip away at religious discrimination

Oral arguments were made last week in a Supreme Court case about equitable treatment of tax dollars for private schools. The case was brought by Kendra Espinoza, a Montana single mother struggling to keep her children in better (private) schools and thwarted by a state rule banning tax credit scholarships. This article by friend Star Parker summarizes immediate and broader issues in play, in particular for minority parents in districts with failing schools. We anticipate an outcome in Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue that upholds religious and education freedom.

2020-02-05T21:46:49-05:00February 5th, 2020|

ACRU lights a birthday candle to celebrate Citizens United decision

In 2009, ACRU issued an Amicus Brief urging the Supreme Court to find in favor of Citizens United and constitutional freedom in the case of Citizens United v. FEC. The case began in 2007 when a political movie about Hillary Clinton was blocked for distribution by liberal activists who didn't like the subject matter and used the McCain-Feingold Act as a battering ram. The Supreme Court correctly decided in favor of Citizens United by applying Constitutional free speech provisions to ensure a broader, more level playing field for American political activity. January 21, 2020 was the tenth anniversary of this landmark case, finalized in a 5-4 decision split along ideological lines with the more liberal justices on the Court arguing against free speech for any member of the public speaking through an entity. The framers of the Constitution made it clear that voters should fully briefed on both sides of any policy or political issue and at ACRU, we concur. We are grateful to Citizens United and David Bossie for bringing this critical Constitutional case before the Supreme Court of the United States.

2020-04-23T21:50:28-04:00January 27th, 2020|

ACRU supports right to keep and bear arms in Supreme Court case

American Civil Rights Union (ACRU) supports the Second Amendment rights of New York City residents as the Supreme Court decides whether the New York City law criminalizing transport of registered guns outside the home is unconstitutional. The American Civil Rights Union (ACRU) has filed an amicus brief supporting the petitioners in the case New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. City of New York in the Supreme Court of the United States. The Constitution clearly outlines the right to “keep and bear” arms. The right to bear arms is at stake in the case. New York State Rifle & Pistol Association seeks to overturn a decision to uphold [...]

2020-04-23T21:59:36-04:00December 2nd, 2019|
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